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Best Core Exercise To Flatten Stomach VIDEO

 






 

Exercises You Should Never Do For Cervical Spondylosis VIDEO



 

Rolling Spine Exercise VIDEO






 

Simple Strategy To Cure Anxiety VIDEO

Anxiety can cause weight gain.






 

Steve June 2017 Walking Log

Steve began logging his miles in June of 2017. Although he does a lot of walking at work, he had no idea just how much. When I said I was going to compete with him, I had no idea how much he walked either. There is no competition there. Many days he walks between 5 and 8 miles. One reason he can do what he does at 71 years old is that he has a perfectly symmetrical body. Big, but symmetrical. I, on the other hand, have structural issues that prevent me from going the distance. I’m still out there though – doing what is healthy for me to do without causing injury.

CONGRATULATIONS TO STEVE! 4.13 Marathons In A Month!!! 

06.01.17     04.20

06.02.17     05.00

06.03.17     02.80

06.04.17     01.20

06.05.17     03.20

06.06.17     04.60

06.07.17     03.90

06.08.17     04.20

06.09.17     04.00

06.10.17     03.30

06.11.17     07.60

06.12.17     03.10

06.13.17     03.50

06.14.17     04.30

06.15.17     03.90

06.16.17     05.30

06.17.17     03.80

06.18.17     00.13

06.19.17     02.50

06.20.17     03.90

06.21.17     05.50

06.22.17     03.90

06.23.17     03.60

06.24.17     04.20

06.25.17     02.00

06.26.17     01.70

06.27.17     04.20

06.28.17     04.70

06.29.17     04.30

06.30.17     03.50

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Steve walked 107.33 miles in 30 days in June. That equals 4.13 marathons. Wow. That’s a lot of walking.






 

How losing weight affects your body and brain

Special thanks to John Gunstad, Professor with the Department of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University, for speaking with us about his cutting-edge research on how losing weight affects brain function. Following is a transcript of the video.

Here’s what losing weight does to your body and brain.

During the first week you may find it easy to lose weight by simply switching to a healthier diet. But as your metabolism adjusts, you won’t burn as many calories as you used to.

So, losing additional weight will become harder.

Making matters worse, as the fat melts away you’ll start to experience an increase in appetite. After a meal, fat cells release a hormone called leptin into the bloodstream.

This surge in leptin levels signals to your brain you’re full and should stop eating. But with less overall fat, people who lose weight show a measurable dip in leptin.

Brain scans of obese patients who had lost 10% of their body weight revealed less leptin leads to increased activity in regions of the brain that control our desire to eat.

The end result isn’t just an increased appetite, but an even stronger urge to eat fatty, high-calorie foods because your brain is trying to restore the body’s leptin levels to normal…

Finish reading:How losing weight affects your body and brain – Business Insider






 

Steve July 2017 Walking Log

Steve walked a total of 90.78 miles in July. That equals 3.49 marathons in 31 days.  average per day = 2.92 miles per day

07.01.17     02.80

07.02.17     00.38

07.03.17     01.90

07.04.17     03.30

07.05.17     04.20

07.06.17     02.70

07.07.17     03.80

07.08.17     03.40

07.09.17     02.10

07.10.17     02.60

07.11.17     03.80

07.12.17     03.00

07.13.17     02.80

07.14.17     03.30

07.15.17     03.20

07.16.17     01.20

07.17.17     03.60

07.18.17     03.70

07.19.17     04.00

07.20.17     03.30

07.21.17     03.10

07.22.17     03.20

07.23.17     02.00

07.24.17     02.70

07.25.17     04.70

07.26.17     03.20

07.27.17     03.60

07.28.17     03.10

07.29.17     03.40

07.30.17     02.70

07.31.17     00.99

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Steve walked a total of 90.78 miles in July. That equals 3.49 marathons in 31 days.  average per day = 2.92 miles per day






 

Exercises To Improve Balance

1 – Romberg Exercise

Stand with chair in front and wall in back.

Arms down to sides. Feet together.

Hold for 30 seconds progress to doing with eyes closed.

2 – Sway Exercise

Stand with chair in front and wall in back.

Sway forward to back.

Sway right to left.

Do 2 times daily 30 times, then with eyes closed.

3 – Marching In Place

Stand with chair in front and wall in back.

March with arms at sides in place, lifting knees high toward ceiling.

Do 30 times twice daily, then with eyes closed.

4 – Turning In Place

Stand with chair in front and wall in back.

With arms at sides turn one half circle (180 degrees). Stop for 10 seconds if dizzy.

Do 5 times turning to left, then to right. Whichever makes you dizzier focus on that 2 times per day.

Progress to full circle with eyes shut.

5 – Head Movements While Standing

Stand with chair in front and wall in back.

Step 1. Move head up and down 10 times.

Step 2. Move head 10 times side to side.

Step 3. Move head diagonally up and down 10 times.

Step 4. Move head diagonally up and down 10 times on opposite side.

6 – Walking Exercises

  1. Walk 5 steps and stop abruptly. Wait 10 seconds or till dizziness goes. Repeat till you’ve walked 50 feet.
  2. Walk 5 steps, then turn around and walk back. Wait 10 seconds. Repeat 5 times.
  3. Walk and turn your head to the left, then right every other step for 50 feet.





 

A Motivating Tool|Or Exercise

Yes, making lists is a form of exercise – mental/brain and physical.

For me, rarely if ever do I follow the list. It’s the making of one that motivates me to get going again. It doesn’t matter at what. One thing leads to another thing is the continuing motivating force that leads to success in getting things done – maybe not in the order I listed them and maybe much of it wasn’t even on the list, but it all eventually gets done – and then some.

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Laying My Exercise Foundation

MY EXERCISE BAR

A 3 feet 3 inch long tension curtain rod, fully closed, I use for my exercise bar. Small circumference. You can buy longer or thicker; this suits me.

Since I have dystonia, a spinal cord and spinal column injuries, muscle, nerve and joint pain, tendonitis probably due to computer work, in neck, shoulders, elbows and wrists, I’m backtracking and starting over. I went for the gold, so to speak, and overdid it.

I’m laying my foundation by working out absent weights or resistance, using an exercise bar to balance, stabilize and guide me, applying my own body parts as the weight to strengthen my small muscles in neck, core and legs, while simultaneously bringing my larger muscles into the action.

I’m also using the bar for stretching all individual muscles and muscle groups.

My goal right now is to increase slowly the reps and sets I do throughout the day/night, being mindful of new stresses and strains. And taking breaks from it when needed, whether that means a day or two or three.

I discovered that the bar can give quite a work-out.






 

 

KAPUT

What do they say about the best-laid plans? They often go awry? Well, that’s me and my gym/spa escapade. I have to get up so early, and the bus trip is long and sometimes the bus wait isn’t a pleasant experience, then the bus trip back all before Steve goes to work. Then on opposite days he does the same thing.

All the preparation, it’s like packing for an overnight trip someplace. The showers and lockers, and pool, hot tub and sauna, everything needing an order to it, that takes up way too much of my time for such little gains. Mostly setbacks, as my muscles aren’t really ready for the big machines. This tendonitis just doesn’t want to go away.

Ten minutes rowing, ten minutes on a bicycle, 20 minutes on the machines, 10 minutes in the hot tub and again ten in the sauna, then I have to do the shower and dressing thing, but have to undress to go into the pool area, the floor is slippery, sometimes the sauna isn’t hot enough, nor the hot tub, and I’m wondering why I don’t feel better than I do after all this effort.

Steve feels the same way.

Every time I work out I want to go out to eat. What’s that about? I never even got to use the pool. Too many classes and when I was available the pool wasn’t.

We can exercise in-home, then outside walking, do the stairs in the building, we have enough equipment to make the required impact if we just do it. We both came to the same realization. There’s no shame in quitting if we continue on our own path and what works best for us. We already know what that is and how to do it.

So it’s kaput for the gym/spa. Sounded like a good idea, but it wasn’t a good fit for us.

Now it’s back to the old-fashioned way of exercising.

 






 

determination

Let ‘er rip.

Slow and steady.

Find your rhythm and focus.






 

TURNING THE CORNER

Steve finally made it to the gym after procrastinating since September 2016. In fairness he had a stroke over Christmas and had a long recovery from carotid artery surgery, so he had some excuses. For me there were lots of excuses, but none of them were valid – the main one being I just didn’t feel like it.

It’s now 30 March 2017. I decided yesterday that I would cancel the membership. Why pay every month when I don’t go? Why pay 48$ a month for a bus pass on top of the membership fee, when I can exercise at home? Steve decided the same.

It takes up too much time – all the prep stuff to get there, then the winding down time. It was simply too big a block of time.

I have a balance ball, 5 and 10 lb. free weights, cords and a bunch of stairs, a sweat suit that makes me sweat out toxins, and a bar made from a tension curtain rod that’s the perfect size for me. I do stretching and crunches with no assist appliances. Plus I walk everywhere I go, unless it’s too far, then I take a bus. In fairness to myself I have been fairly consistent with my home exercises.

This morning I wake up and lay in bed thinking today is the day I quit. When I called the gym yesterday, the person I talked to on the phone said I needed to come in to cancel. They don’t do it over the phone. So, here I am ready to make my first appearance at the gym since September to cancel my membership and Steve’s.

I’m keeping an open mind I told Steve before I left.

When I got there I was given a tour by a guy whom I told my plan to. I figured since I’m here I might as well try it on for size and see if it fits. By the end of the tour and the end of my light work-out I decided to stay with it. I think the guy figured that just me showing up meant I probably really did want to do this.

The other day I read an article by the NO MEAT ATHLETE about forming new habits. It takes 30 days to form one or to break one. I think. Anyway, I’m going to form a new habit of making the gym a part of my life. For 30 days I will show up to the gym and do something, anything. Maybe one day work out in one area, maybe the next day do the water and sauna stuff. Don’t really know except that I will be there. After that I’ll reassess how often I want to participate.

The gym is no stranger to me, but it has been a really long time.

I’m looking forward to tomorrow. I turned the corner onto a new, better path.

Oh, and Steve decided to stay with it too.






 

Steve’s first SPA DAY (3-16-2017)

3-16-2017

Steve also got a spa membership back in September 2016 and has yet to use it except to take the tour – until today.

Found a machine he liked, did the HIIT (high intensity interval training). Hit the pool, hot tub and steam. When he called from work I could hear the relaxed in his tone.






 

It’s all good: Any exercise cuts risk of death, study finds

It’s all good: Any exercise cuts risk of death, study finds

Weekend warriors, take a victory lap. People who pack their workouts into one or two sessions a week lower their risk of dying over roughly the next decade nearly as much as people who exercise more often, new research suggests.

 She had no role in the study, but wrote a commentary published with the results Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. Here are some things to know. HOW MUCH EXERCISE DO WE NEED? U.S. and global guidelines call for 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, ideally spread out so you get some on most days…

Finish reading: It’s all good: Any exercise cuts risk of death, study finds






 

Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief – FOR THOSE WHO EXERCISE OR DON’T

All people who work out experience pain in their muscles, tendons and/or ligaments. It is a natural result of increasing your strength and stamina through exercise. Even those who don’t engage in structured work outs still experience inflammation and pain simply by living their lives and going about their work.

Many of us don’t like nor want the short term and long term nuisance effects as well as harmful side effects of over the counter anti-inflammatory drugs. Take a look below to get the scoop on drugs and natural remedies so you can make a better informed decision regarding the treatment of your inflammation and pain and as a result experience more productive work outs and/or a more comfortable physical life working at whatever job you do.


“…Various studies have also shown that NSAIDs can delay muscle regeneration and may reduce ligament, tendon, and cartilage healing.[4,13,77] Specifically, NSAIDs are believed to wipe out the entire inflammatory mediated proliferative phase of healing associated with WBC actions (days 0–4). A study of the effects of NSAIDs on acute hamstring injuries was done in humans by Reynolds et al.,[93] and these investigators concluded that patients who used NSAIDs did not experience a greater reduction of pain and soft-tissue swelling when compared with the placebo group. Interestingly enough, the authors noted that the NSAIDs’ group had worse pain associated with severe injuries compared with the placebo group.

The NSAIDs are also known to have adverse effects on kidney function.[31] Dehydration or preexisting chronic renal failure or disease, resulting in stimulation of the renin–angiotensin system, may predispose certain populations to acute renal failure through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, which can occur when taking NSAIDs.[31] The National Kidney Foundation asserts that approximately 10% of kidney failures per year are directly correlated to substantial overuse of NSAIDs….

Read further for: Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief






 

Competitiveness Helps Improve Motivation and Fitness Gains

Tapping into that competitive spirit may be the key you’ve been looking for if you’re still struggling to get to the gym on a regular basis.

By Dr. Mercola

Those who succeed at maintaining good health into old age typically have one thing in common: They’ve made regular exercise a part of their day-to-day lifestyle.

Most people realize that exercise is necessary for health and longevity. The challenge that prevents many from implementing a regular fitness regimen is lack of or inconsistent motivation. It takes time to build a new habit, and you need to somehow stay the course. Staying motivated is part of that equation.

Researchers now believe they may have discovered a potent way to boost your motivation to exercise.

Exercise Boosts Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Your Body’s Stress Response

Exercise has undeniable positive effects on your mood, with anxiety reduction key among them.This is what keeps many devoted exercisers coming back for more.

A study by Princeton University researchers revealed that exercising creates new, excitable neurons along with new neurons designed to release the GABA neurotransmitter, which inhibits excessive neuronal firing, helping to induce blissful feelings and a natural state of calm.1

The Benefits of Competitiveness

Are you a competitive person? If so, tapping into that competitive spirit may be the key you’ve been looking for if you’re still struggling to get to the gym on a regular basis.

According to researchers, people who were primed for competition ended up participating in 90 percent more exercise classes than those who weren’t. As reported by Time magazine:2

“Friendly social support makes you work out less often, while cutthroat competition is the key to motivating yourself to get to the gym.”

Social Support Versus Competition…

Continue reading: Competitiveness Helps Improve Motivation and Fitness Gains






 

A YMCA MEMBERSHIP – taking a tour

HAPPY BIRTHDAY STEVE – and me too! Just what we needed as a tool to help us lose weight, increase strength and stamina! No excuses now.

Steve said, “It’s a perfect Birthday present!” A brand new facility, close to work. Beautiful.

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