Posted in BREAKFAST, DAIRY FREE YOGURT

Fresh Fruit And Veggie Yogurt Salad

FRUIT AND VEGGIE SAVORY YOGURT 2

FRESH FRUIT AND VEGGIE YOGURT SALAD

Fresh corn with pineapple? Fresh apple with English cucumber? Kalamata olive and fresh basil? All marinated in dairy free yogurt with smoked paprika, coriander and brown sugar? Toss in some Himalayan salt? Super natural juice rush? That’s what I ate for breakfast for a week. I couldn’t stop myself. You’ll probably think it’s not that great, but for whatever reason I finished every last morsel and drop. Would I make it again? If I want to feel as good as I felt all this week, probably yes.

Makes about 8 cups

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Posted in MAIN DISH, PLANT MEATS, REDUCED-FAT RECIPES, TOMATOES

GIMME LEAN SAUSAGE AND TOMATO

SAUSAGE AND TOMATO 3

GIMME LEAN SAUSAGE AND TOMATO

A plant meat and veggie saute. Tastier and more satisfying than the animal counterpart! No leap needed here. Low-fat too!

Makes 6-1/2 cups

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Posted in CONDIMENTS, MARINADES, TOMATOES, VEGGIES

MARINATED TOMATOES AND FRESH HERBS

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MARINATED TOMATOES AND FRESH HERBS

Even when cooking with oils, fresh herbs rarely flavor a sauce as much as we think they should. Dried herbs are always needed in addition to the fresh. We usually add the fresh right at the end of cooking time for best result, but even then, the flavor effect is minimal – from the fresh herbs.

Now that we’re not using oils, I’m looking for new ways to flavor sauces – especially tomato sauces. Instead of doing the ‘add at end of cooking time’ thing, I decided to marinate the tomatoes that I would be using in the sauce with the fresh herbs and let them sit in the refrigerator for a day or two or three.

I added .75 oz. each of fresh oregano and fresh basil, washed well, to a quart jar with 2, 28 oz. cans of San Marzano Tomatoes.

When first tasted after marinating, I didn’t taste anything that resembled an herb. When I heated the tomatoes and herbs in a saucepan, that’s when the flavors emerged and stayed prominent throughout the cooking of the sauce.

In the past, when making a soup and before adding the oils I would notice that the flavors after adding the oils became markedly muted. So, I’m wondering if the same would have happened with the tomato sauce had I added oil (which I didn’t). It just seemed that the herbs were especially prominent.

I’m beginning to think that the amount of flavor additives needed in an oiled sauce are greater than a non oiled sauce – or soup. The oil keeps the herbs and/or veggies from exhibiting their natural scents and flavors to their full potential.

If you like fresh herbs, try marinating them with the tomatoes before adding both to your sauce. See if you like it. I know I did. I didn’t need dried herbs with the sauce I made from these marinated tomatoes and fresh herbs. That’s a first – for me.

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