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AFC BANANA DIET WEIGHT LOSS AIDS

6 Good Reasons to Eat a Banana Today

What goodness is in a banana? Other than being rich in vitamin B6, bananas are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and manganese.

W​hat do these mean for your health? The Dietetics Department at Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre explains.​ ​

BANANAS are not only rich in vitamins and fibre, but are also fat-free and cholesterol-free.

Ever wondered what goodness is in a banana? Other than being rich in vitamin B6, bananas are a good source of vitamin C, dietary fibre and manganese. Bananas are also fat-free, cholesterol-free and virtually sodium-free. So what do these mean for your health?

Ms Peggy Tan, Dietitian, Tion​​g Bahru C​ommunity Health Centre, a member of the SingHealth group, explains why bananas are good for you and when you should eat them.

Health benefits of bananas​​

1. ​Bananas are one of the best fruit sources of vitamin B6​

Vitamin B6 from bananas is easily absorbed by your body and a medium-sized banana can provide about a quarter of your daily vitamin B6 needs.

Vitamin B6 helps your body:

produce red blood cells,

metabolise carbohydrates and fats, turning them into energy,

metabolise amino acids,

remove unwanted chemicals from your liver and kidneys, and

maintain a healthy nervous system.

Vitamin B6 is also good for pregnant women as it helps meet their baby’s development needs.

2. Bananas are respectable sources of vitamin C

You may not associate bananas with vitamin C but a medium-sized banana will provide about 10% of your daily vitamin C needs.Vitamin C helps:

protect your body against cell and tissue damage,

your body absorb iron better,

your body produce collagen – the protein which holds your skin, bones and body together, and

support brain health by producing serotonin, a hormone that affects our sleep cycle, moods, and experiences of stress a​nd pain.

3. Manganese in bananas is good for your skin

One medium-sized banana provides approximately 13% of your daily manganese needs. Manganese helps your body make collagen and protects your skin and other cells against free radical damage.

4. Potassium in bananas is good for your heart health and blood pressure

A medium-sized banana will provide around 320-400 mg of potassium, which meets about 10% of your daily potassium needs.

Potassium helps your body maintain a healthy heart and blood pressure. In addition, bananas are low in sodium. The low sodium and high potassium combination helps to control high blood pressure.

5. Bananas can aid digestion and help beat gastrointestinal issues

A medium banana will provide about 10-12% of your daily fibre needs. Singapore’s Health Promotion Board recommends a daily dietary fibre intake of 20g for women and 26g for men.

Soluble and insoluble fibres play an important role in your health. Soluble fibre helps your body control your blood sugar level and get rid of fatty substances such as cholesterol. Insoluble fibre adds weight and softness to stools, making it easier for you to have regular bowel movements. This helps to keep your gut healthy and safe from harmful bacteria.

Bananas, especially newly-ripened ones, contain starch that does not digest (resistant starch) in your small intestine and is able to pass into the large intestine. Such bananas help you manage your weight better as you stay full for longer.

That said, bananas can help you beat gastrointestinal issues such as:

constipation,

stomach ulcers, and

heartburn

6. Bananas give you energy – minus the fats and cholesterol​

Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose – giving you a fat and cholesterol-free source of energy. As such, bananas are ideal, especially for children and athletes, for breakfast, as a midday snack or before and after sports.

SOURCE: 6 GOOD REASONS TO EAT A BANANA TODAY


 





 

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Collagen: ‘Fountain of Youth’ or Edible Hoax?

FFC COMMENT: Only animals contain collagen. It’s a group of proteins not found in plants – supposedly. The body is loaded with it. So if you’re on the plant train and you want more collagen, you need to eat plants that boost collagen production. I don’t know if these do actually boost collagen production, but it’s the same list of fruits, veggies, beans, nuts with all the colors that are suggested to cure or prevent all other ailments.

Consuming donkey skin? Oh my God, what people won’t do to stay young looking. Just be the best, strongest, nicest God-damned old person on the God-damned planet and you will feel plenty young. Don’t let anybody chew you up and spit you out. I see people on television with lips that hang down to their neck. It looks ridiculous. Stop drinking all that coffee, tea, diet soda and alcohol and you might feel better. When you feel good you look good. Go for vibrant instead of everybody wanting to look like a barbie doll on steroids. It’s repulsive. Why would anybody want to take growth hormones? That’s what they fatten up cows and pigs with. It’s not normal to ingest large amounts of concentrated forms of animal parts – for any reason. Fanatics. They’re all fanatics.

Stop the insanity. Eat your plant foods. That’s what you’re lacking.


March 8, 2018 — As a cosmetics sales professional in New York City, Melinda Mora has always taken painstakingly good care of her skin. She puts on the latest serums, has skin-rejuvenating laser treatments, never leaves the house without sunscreen, and — for the past 6 months or so — spikes her morning smoothie each day with a hefty scoop of powdered cow, chicken, and fish collagen.

“Honestly, it doesn’t taste like anything,” she says, adding that her plump skin, stronger nails, and pain-free joints make her unusual breakfast choice worth it. “I’ve really started to notice a difference.”

U.S. consumers are expected to spend $122 million on collagen products in 2018.

For centuries, Chinese women have viewed collagen as a Fountain of Youth, routinely consuming foods like donkey skin in hopes of smoothing withered skin and preserving aging joints. In the United States, collagen became best known in the 1980s as an expensive injectable filler to plump lips and soften lines. But only in recent years, as companies have come up with more appetizing ways to take it (including fruity chews, vanilla-flavored-powders and easy-to-swallow capsules) has edible collagen begun to catch on here.

In 2018, thanks in part to a small but growing body of evidence suggesting it can improve skin, ease arthritis symptoms, promote wound healing, and fend off muscle wasting, U.S. consumers are expected to spend $122 million on collagen products. That’s up 30% from last year, according to market research firm Nutrition Business Journal…

FINISH READING: Collagen: ‘Fountain of Youth’ or Edible Hoax?