Broccoli Curry Ramen Broth

BROCCOLI CURRY RAMEN BROTH 

Lots of broccoli processed with a store-bought IMAGINE brand Ramen Broth till fine-textured. Combined with water, pink Himalayan salt, a drizzle of extra virgin olive and mild sesame seed oil. Add some mellow miso, curry, coriander, mustard and garlic. Serve as is, or re-blend after it’s cooked for a creamier texture – whichever way you prefer. Maybe half and half? Tasty, satisfying and healthy too!

Makes 13-1/2 cups

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8 High-Protein Vegetables

8 High-Protein Vegetables

Slabs of meat don’t have to be the only protein-rich items on your dinner plate. Check out which vegetables provide the protein boost you’re looking for.

Stephanie Smith And Krissy Kendall, PhD

August 25, 2017

No, we’re not talking about sprinkling your greens with a scoop of protein powder or chasing those string beans with a double-strength protein shake. Believe it or not, there are vegetables that can be part of a protein-fueled dish on their own—and not just because they’re paired with a medium-rare steak or rotisserie chicken.

We’ve put together a list of the eight vegetables that provide the most protein bang for your buck.

1. Soybeans

With more protein than any other bean variety, cooked soybeans have about 28 grams per cup, roughly the amount of protein that can be found in 150 grams of chicken. More important, soybeans are one of only two complete plant proteins, the other one being quinoa.

A serving of soybeans also contains 17 grams of carbs and 15 grams of fats, 58 percent of which are essential fatty acids. The insoluble fiber in these beans promotes digestive health, while the unsaturated fat promotes cardiovascular health.

Protein content: 28.6 g per cup (boiled)…

FINISH READING: 8 High-Protein Vegetables






 

Soy Products and Cruciferous Vegetables Reduce Breast Cancer Treatment Symptoms 

Soy Products and Cruciferous Vegetables Reduce Breast Cancer Treatment Symptoms

Soy products and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, kale, and Brussels sprouts reduce treatment-related side effects among breast cancer survivors, according to research published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

Researchers followed 365 cancer survivors and compared symptoms such as hot flashes, joint pain, fatigue, and memory issues with soy and cruciferous vegetable consumption. Higher intakes of these foods lowered the odds of these symptoms, compared with women who consumed little or no soy or cruciferous vegetables. Researchers attribute the reduced risk to better regulation of estrogens, reduced inflammation, and increased intake of phytochemicals found in these foods…

Source: http://www.pcrm.org/health/medNews/soy-products-and-cruciferous-vegetables-reduce-breast-cancer-treatment-symptoms






 

Broccoli Red Fried Rice And Quinoa

BROCCOLI RED FRIED RICE AND QUINOA 4

BROCCOLI RED FRIED RICE AND QUINOA

Ever  taste juicy fried grains? This is it! What a chew! Reduced fat too! Less than one teaspoon fat per one cup serving!

Steve’s on a fried rice kick, so thought I’d rearrange the foundation of fried rice by using quinoa plus red rice which functions as the meat. Success! He added a fresh ginger stick topper and smoky ketchup! Yup! His way!

Makes 9 cups

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JUST PLAIN IS JUST FINE WITH ME

Once every week or two after going grocery shopping, I prep the fresh vegetables I’m going to be eating like snacks. This week it was brussel sprouts, broccoli (including the trimmed and sliced stems into rounds), spinach, green beans, asparagus and corn.

I just eat them plain. Nothing on them. Same thing with the corn – no margarine, oil nor salt and pepper. I’m just tasting the essence of the veggies. And I like it.

If I gain weight this week, it’s not because I ate these veggies plain.






 

BROCCOLI WILD RICE

BROCCOLI WILD RICE

A simple fried wild rice dish with broccoli, sauteed onion and celery, with fresh carrot ribbons. A little curry, garlic, salt and pepper is all you need to season. A low fat rice dish made to please and satisfy!

Makes 4-1/2 cups

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How to Maximize Broccoli’s Cancer-Fighting Potential

Broccoli has been widely studied for its many health effects, and research shows that it may reduce risk for many common diseases like arthritis, cancer, and more.

By Dr. Mercola

Vegetables offer a wide range of health benefits, but some seem to have greater potential to ward off disease than others. Broccoli falls into this category, having been widely studied for its many health effects.

Research shows this cruciferous veggie (in the same family as Brussels sprouts, cabbagecauliflower and more) may reduce your risk for many common diseases, including but not limited to:

  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • High blood pressure and heart disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Diabetes

Broccoli Contains Many Health Boosting Compounds

When you eat broccoli, you’re getting dozens, maybe even hundreds, of super-nutrients that support optimal, body-wide health. This includes but is not limited to:

• Fiber, which helps nourish your gut microbiome and strengthen your immune function.

• Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring organic sulfur compound shown to have potent anti-cancer activity.

Studies have shown sulforaphane causes apoptosis (programmed cell death) in colon,1 prostate,2 breast3 and tobacco-induced lung cancer4 cells. Three servings of broccoli per week may reduce your risk of prostate cancer by more than 60 percent.5

Sulforaphane encourages production of enzymes that protect your blood vessels, and reduces the number of molecules that cause cell damage — known as reactive oxygen species (ROS) — by as much as 73 percent.6

Interestingly, sulforaphane is both an immune stimulant and an anti-inflammatory.7

Sulforaphane also helps raise testosterone levels, inhibits the retention of body fat, helps detox carcinogens,8 blocks certain enzymes linked to joint destruction9 and helps protect your muscles against exercise-induced damage.10

Please note that frozen broccoli has diminished ability to produce sulforaphane as the enzyme myrosinase,11 which converts glucoraphanin to sulforaphane, is quickly destroyed during the blanching process.12

• Glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate precursor of sulforaphane that also influences the process of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis.13,14 Compared to mature broccoli, broccoli sprouts can contain up to 20 times more glucoraphanin.

• Phenolic compounds, including flavonoids and phenolic acids, which have a potent ability to eliminate damaging free radicals and quell inflammation,15,16,17resulting in a lower risk for diseases such as asthma, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.18

One of the ways phenolic compounds slow the encroachment of disease is by defending against infection, most dramatically by zapping ROS linked to atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

• Diindolylmethane (DIM). Your body produces DIM when it breaks down cruciferous vegetables. Like many other broccoli compounds, DIM has shown multiple potential benefits, including boosting your immune system and helping to prevent or treat cancer.19,20

Finish reading: How to Maximize Broccoli’s Cancer-Fighting Potential