Posted in FAT-FREE FRIDAY, MARINADES, PLANT MEATS

ORANGE BARBECUE MARINADE FOR PLANT MEAT

TEMPEH PACKAGE

ORANGE BARBECUE MARINADE FOR PLANT MEAT

This marinade I used to marinate Tempeh – fermented soybean cake that is used as an animal meat substitute.

Makes 1-3/4 cups


1/2 c. ketchup

1/4 c. prepared yellow mustard

1/4 c. Balsamic vinegar

1 T. liquid smoke

1 T. Worcestershire sauce

1/2 c. diet Coke or Pepsi

zest and juice of 1 orange (zest first, juice second)

1 t. garlic powder

1 t. onion powder

1 t. sea salt

fresh grind black pepper to taste


 14 oz. pkg. Tempeh (I used Lightlife brand)


Combine all ingredients in bowl except Tempeh and whisk till smooth.

Boil slab of Tempeh in water to cover for 10 minutes. Remove and drain. When cool, cut into 3/4 inch cubes and submerge in marinade, cover and refrigerate. I marinated this Tempeh for 1 week, since I was too busy with other stuff to prepare this dish. It held up very well. The flavors of the marinade don’t go through the bean cake like you might think. However, it does flavor it nicely.

For the recipe I used it in go to: ORANGE TEMPEH WITH SAFFRON RICE.

Notes: 

Tempeh (/ˈtɛmp/; Javanese: témpéIPA: [tempe]) is a traditional soy product originating from Indonesia. It is made by a natural culturing and controlled fermentation process that binds soybeans into a cake form. Tempeh is unique among major traditional soy foods in that it is the only one that did not originate from Greater Chinese cuisine.

It originated in today’s Indonesia, and is especially popular on the island of Java, where it is a staple source of protein. Like tofu, tempeh is made from soybeans, but it is a whole soybean product with different nutritional characteristics and textural qualities. Tempeh’s fermentation process and its retention of the whole bean give it a higher content of protein, dietary fiber, and vitamins. It has a firm texture and an earthy flavor which becomes more pronounced as it ages.[1][2] Because of its nutritional value, tempeh is used worldwide in vegetarian cuisine, where it is used as a meat analogue…Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempeh

TEMPEH OUT OF PACKAGE

TEMPEH IN PAN






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Posted in CONDIMENTS, MARINADES, TOMATOES, VEGGIES

MARINATED TOMATOES AND FRESH HERBS

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MARINATED TOMATOES AND FRESH HERBS

Even when cooking with oils, fresh herbs rarely flavor a sauce as much as we think they should. Dried herbs are always needed in addition to the fresh. We usually add the fresh right at the end of cooking time for best result, but even then, the flavor effect is minimal – from the fresh herbs.

Now that we’re not using oils, I’m looking for new ways to flavor sauces – especially tomato sauces. Instead of doing the ‘add at end of cooking time’ thing, I decided to marinate the tomatoes that I would be using in the sauce with the fresh herbs and let them sit in the refrigerator for a day or two or three.

I added .75 oz. each of fresh oregano and fresh basil, washed well, to a quart jar with 2, 28 oz. cans of San Marzano Tomatoes.

When first tasted after marinating, I didn’t taste anything that resembled an herb. When I heated the tomatoes and herbs in a saucepan, that’s when the flavors emerged and stayed prominent throughout the cooking of the sauce.

In the past, when making a soup and before adding the oils I would notice that the flavors after adding the oils became markedly muted. So, I’m wondering if the same would have happened with the tomato sauce had I added oil (which I didn’t). It just seemed that the herbs were especially prominent.

I’m beginning to think that the amount of flavor additives needed in an oiled sauce are greater than a non oiled sauce – or soup. The oil keeps the herbs and/or veggies from exhibiting their natural scents and flavors to their full potential.

If you like fresh herbs, try marinating them with the tomatoes before adding both to your sauce. See if you like it. I know I did. I didn’t need dried herbs with the sauce I made from these marinated tomatoes and fresh herbs. That’s a first – for me.

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