Posted in FASTING

How Intermittent Fasting Might Help You Live a Longer and Healthier Life – Scientific American

How Intermittent Fasting Might Help You Live a Longer and Healthier Life

Intermittent fasting might improve health, but clinical data are thin

By David Stipp on January 1, 2013

Credit: Kelly BlairIn E. B White’s beloved novel Charlotte’s Web, an old sheep advises the gluttonous rat Templeton that he would live longer if he ate less. “Who wants to live forever?” Templeton sneers. “I get untold satisfaction from the pleasures of the feast.”

It is easy to empathize with Templeton, but the sheep’s claim has some merit. Studies have shown that reducing typical calorie consumption, usually by 30 to 40 percent, extends life span by a third or more in many animals, including nematodes, fruit flies and rodents.

When it comes to calorie restriction in primates and people, however, the jury is still out. Although some studies have suggested that monkeys that eat less live longer, a new 25-year-long primate study concluded that calorie restriction does not extend average life span in rhesus monkeys. Even if calorie restriction does not help anyone live longer, a large portion of the data supports the idea that limiting food intake reduces the risks of diseases common in old age and lengthens the period of life spent in good health.

If only one could claim those benefits without being hungry all the time. There might be a way.

In recent years researchers have focused on a strategy known as intermittent fasting as a promising alternative to continuous calorie restriction.

Intermittent fasting, which includes everything from periodic multiday fasts to skipping a meal or two on certain days of the week, may promote some of the same health benefits that uninterrupted calorie restriction promises. The idea of intermittent fasting is more palatable to most people because, as Templeton would be happy to hear, one does not have to renounce the pleasures of the feast.

Studies indicate that rodents that feast one day and fast the next often consume fewer calories overall than they would normally and live just as long as rats eating calorie-restricted meals every single day.

In a 2003 mouse study overseen by Mark Mattson, head of the National Institute on Aging’s neuroscience laboratory, mice that fasted regularly were healthier by some measures than mice subjected to continuous calorie restriction; they had lower levels of insulin and glucose in their blood, for example, which signified increased sensitivity to insulin and a reduced risk of diabetes.

The First Fasts:

Religions have long maintained that fasting is good for the soul, but its bodily benefits were not widely recognized until the early 1900s, when doctors began recommending it to treat various disorders—such as diabetes, obesity and epilepsy.

Related research on calorie restriction took off in the 1930s, after Cornell University nutritionist Clive McCay discovered that rats subjected to stringent daily dieting from an early age lived longer and were less likely to develop cancer and other diseases as they aged, compared with animals that ate at will.

Research on calorie restriction and periodic fasting intersected in 1945, when University of Chicago scientists reported that alternate-day feeding extended the life span of rats as much as daily dieting in McCay’s earlier experiments. Moreover, intermittent fasting “seems to delay the development of the disorders that lead to death,” the Chicago researchers wrote.

In the next decades research into antiaging diets took a backseat to more influential medical advances, such as the continued development of antibiotics and coronary artery bypass surgery.

More recently, however, Mattson and other researchers have championed the idea that intermittent fasting probably lowers the risks of degenerative brain diseases in later life. Mattson and his colleagues have shown that periodic fasting protects neurons against various kinds of damaging stress, at least in rodents.

One of his earliest studies revealed that alternate-day feeding made the rats’ brains resistant to toxins that induce cellular damage akin to the kind cells endure as they age. In follow-up rodent studies, his group found that intermittent fasting protects against stroke damage, suppresses motor deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease and slows cognitive decline in mice genetically engineered to mimic the symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

A decidedly slender man, Mattson has long skipped breakfast and lunch except on weekends. “It makes me more productive,” he says. The 55-year-old researcher, who has a Ph.D. in biology but not a medical degree, has written or co-authored more than 700 articles. Mattson thinks that intermittent fasting acts in part as a form of mild stress that continually revs up cellular defenses against molecular damage.

For instance, occasional fasting increases the levels of “chaperone proteins,” which prevent the incorrect assembly of other molecules in the cell. Additionally, fasting mice have higher levels of brain-derived…

FINISH READING: How Intermittent Fasting Might Help You Live a Longer and Healthier Life – Scientific American


FFC Comment: I noticed the same that Dr. Mattson noticed; if I abstain from breakfast and lunch, I’m more productive and feel less fatigued. However, for years we’ve been told by the media that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, not to skip any meals and in fact graze every two hours. For whom I might ask? For the cereal makers and sellers, along with those selling cows, chickens and pigs for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack. If you want to look like the cows, chickens and pigs look – all fattened up for slaughterer – you eventually will if you keep eating them.











 

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Posted in FASTING

What Is Intermittent Fasting And Does It Actually Work?

Interesting article. Read the whole thing.

By MARKHAM HEID August 1, 2018

Sustainable weight loss. Protection from diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Improved brain health. Enhanced physical fitness and strength. It seems like every week, researchers turn up some new and profound benefit associated with intermittent fasting: eating schedules that incorporate regular periods of low or no food consumption.

By eating normally for several days a week and eating much less on the others, a person may be able to shift her body’s cellular and metabolic processes in ways that promote optimal health. And experts who study intermittent fasting say that while many blanks still need to be filled in, some of the positive health effects of intermittent fasting are no longer in doubt.

“There continues to be good evidence that intermittent fasting is producing weight-loss benefits, and we also have some evidence that these diets can reduce inflammation, they can reduce blood pressure and resting heart rate, and they seem to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system,” says Benjamin Horne, director of cardiovascular and genetic epidemiology at Utah’s non-profit Intermountain Healthcare system, who has published research on the effects of intermittent fasting.

“[Intermittent fasting] is something that is moving into practice in the medical field, and it’s a reasonable approach for people who don’t like daily restriction of their calories.”…

Finish Reading: What Is Intermittent Fasting And Does It Actually Work? | Time






 

Posted in AFC RAPID FAT LOSS DIET, FASTING

AFC RAPID FAT-LOSS DIET DAY 28

8/2/2018  THURSDAY Day 28

Well, I finally got to a fasting day, which is today. I somehow got connected with a group that fasted to bring awareness to the plight of other animals – protesting through fasting the enslavement, torture and slaughter of these lovely creatures who suffer unfathomable atrocities committed against them by billions of humans, every day of every of every year.

Humans have conveniently blocked out their screams by locking them out of public view in processing plants they call them. If it was such a good deed we humans were performing every day of every year we wouldn’t block the heinous acts from the public eye. We take children to dairy farms – not factory farms, and the slaughterhouse, well, that’s just too painful and mind-disrupting to any sane adult, much less a child.

Continue reading “AFC RAPID FAT-LOSS DIET DAY 28”

Posted in discipline, FASTING

Fasting For The Animals

That’s what I’m doing today on the 2nd of August 2018 to help, along with many other concerned individuals, bring awareness to the plight of other animals, whom most humans believe were put on this earth for humans to use, abuse and destroy at will or whim, and that plants are here for some irrelevant purpose. A side dish maybe.

In addition to being happy for an excuse not to cook or eat, many including myself think it advantageous to human health to fast intermittently in order to give the digestive system some resting time while simultaneously cutting back on the total weekly consumption of calories and fat – for weight control purposes.  Most specifically, however, the cutting back on or eliminating the consumption of animals one day a month as part of the fast is the goal. Fasting means eating nothing, which includes plants and animals.

If I do well with this, and I know I will, then I’ll consider adding more days. Hey, if I’m having a hard time losing the fat, then not priming my food pump once a week, instead of once a month might be the answer.

For me, it probably requires less discipline to fast than to eat less when I see everybody eating more.

So, I’m fasting for the animals. That gives me a purpose beyond myself.
 
However, because I am also an animal, that means I’m fasting for me too.

A win-win.

Take a look here: INTERMITTENT FASTING PREVENTS DEGENERATIVE BRAIN DISEASE?

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/

That’s all I had to read, besides what I already know from my own long ago past of fasting. It really does make a body – mind feel and act better.

Join and add your thoughts to the Facebook Group: Animals First On the Second

https://www.facebook.com/groups/138314033456715/