6 Ways Seeing Clutter Changes Your Brain, According To Science

 

6 Ways Seeing Clutter Changes Your Brain, According To Science

By JR THORPE

We’ve all been there: a bedroom filled with piled-up clothes, books you’re definitely going to read one day, and four hundred socks, or a living room strewn with old tea cups and an apparently infinite number of magazines.

Seeing clutter regularly is sometimes an unavoidable fact of life: people form attachments to their possessions for obvious reasons, and since we live in a society where we’re encouraged to buy things constantly, we often end up with living areas full of Disorganized Stuff.

Unless you’re a true minimalist or can organize your life like a pro, you’ve likely lived among clutter at some point — and it turns out that it’s actually kind of stressful for your brain to exist among a bunch of mess.There’s definitely value in streamlining your stuff.

Marie Kondo’s tidy-and-toss KonMari method went viral a few years ago, and her new Netflix show, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo, is a massive hit, with its deceptively simple maxim to only keep those things which “spark joy” in your life.

Apart from the benefits of having a tidier space (not feeling the pressure to read all those books you promised yourself you’d dig into, perhaps?), there’s a good neurological reason to get rid of things that can’t neatly be tucked away. Here’s what your brain does when faced with mess.

  1. You’re Overloaded By Stimuli

FINISH READING: 6 Ways Seeing Clutter Changes Your Brain, According To Science






 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s